Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology

Mapping Keats’s Progress
A Critical Chronology

Keats’s Selected Social Network

About this diagram

This flowchart arranges selected persons in Keats’s social network mainly by indicating (with arrows) through whom Keats meets persons who then become part of that network. This rendering suggests that the most consequential nodes are Charles Cowden Clarke, Leigh Hunt, Benjamin Robert Haydon, and John Hamilton Reynolds. Of course not all persons Keats meets in his adult life are here.

The flowchart also attempts to gauge Keats’s “connection level” with these persons. This assessment is based on the most significant point the relationship achieves. Relationships are, of course, infinitely complex, not to mention mysterious; they evolve, devolve, wax and wane; they can end, begin, and end again. The assessments are, in some cases, challengeable; this remains part of the (dare it be said?) fun in formulating them.

Finally, to return this site’s raison d’etre: at its centre is an attempt to provide an account of Keats’s rapid and remarkable poetical development—Keats’s progress. The narrative behind and within this network illustration is a partial but, I hope, useful representation of that development. Most persons here are, before and after Keats’s death, supportive of his high aspirations, and, in some cases, influence its directions. [See here for a listing of other developmental factors.]

Directions: Scroll over names for pop-up personographies; click on any of the five friendship levels to indicate the level assessed by all others of that level.

Keats’s selected social network: a diagram of relationships between Keats and his contemporaries, created and designed by G. Kim Blank, and encoded in SVG by Martin Holmes, 2021. Diagram of Keats's relationships with others Keats Keats, Tom (1799–1818): Keats’s youngest brother; like Keats, educated at Clarke’s school; tall and thin, considered gentle with good humour Tom Keats Keats, Fanny (1803–89): Keats’s younger sister; Keats is very much protective of her; she marries a Spanish diplomat and writer in 1826 Fanny Keats Wells, Charles (1800–1879): solicitor; friend of Keats; friend, too, of Keats’s youngest brother, Tom, who schooled with Wells; Keats writes an early poem to Wells Wells Ollier brothers, Charles [1788–1859] and James [1795–1851]: publishers, stationers, booksellers; on commission, publishers of Keats’s first collection, 1817 the Olliers Novellos, the: The Novello family. Via Leigh Hunt’s circle, Keats has some social contact with this highly musical and large family, headed by the mother, Mary, and father, Vincent (1781-1861) the Novellos Jefferys, the: The Jeffreys/Jefferys. Keats and his younger two brothers, Tom and George, socialize (somewhat flirtatiously) with the Jeffery sisters, Marian (Marianne) and Sarah Francis the Jefferys Richards, Thomas (?-?): government worker (ordnance office), sometimes theatre reviewer; a casual friend to Keats and some in Keats’s circle Richards Keats, George (1797–1841): older of Keats two younger brothers; attended same school (in Enfield) as Keats; introduces Keats to some lasting friends George Keats Keats, Georgiana (née Wylie) (1798–1879): wife of Keats’s brother, George (they marry 28 March 1818); Keats very fond of her Georgiana Keats Haslam, William (1795–1851): solicitor; generous, kind, and truly devoted friend of Keats, as well as Keats’s siblings Haslam Severn, Joseph (1793–1897): versatile and devoted painter, but mainly a subject painter; attended Royal Academy; friend of Keats, believer in Keats’s genius and in promoting it Severn Wylies, the May 1818: George Keats (Keats’s brother) marries Georgiana Augusta Wylie (?1797-1879). Georgiana’s parents (her father was a military man) have two sons, Henry and Charles the Wylies Mathew, George Felton (1795-?): early London friend of Keats, met via his brother, George, mid-1815; some over-estimated poetic aspirations Mathew Spurgin, John (1797-1866): medical student, then physician, sometimes writer on medical matters, as well as occasional inventor; long-serving Chairman of the Swedenborg Society of London Spurgin Clarke, Charles Cowden (1787–1877): teacher, publisher (including music), bookseller, informed musical and literary interests Clarke Hunt, Leigh (1784–1859): poet, literary critic, editor, journalist, essayist, periodical publisher Hunt Jones, Isabella (unknown birth/death): attractive, mysterious, slightly older, cultured woman, with whom Keats has some passing romantic involvement in May 1817 Isabella Jones Haydon, Benjamin Robert (1786–1846): historical painter, diarist, lecturer; ambitious, volatile, combative; his artistic achievement compromised by pride, inflexible principles, and ego—and a very slow pace Haydon Nothing to link to with The Shelleys yet the Shelleys Smith, Horace (Horatio) (1779–1849): stockbroker, journal and newspaper contributor, very minor poet, writer of historical novels; known to Percy Shelley as generous. H. Smith Reynolds, John Hamilton (1794–1852): clerk, poet, reviewer, novelist, playwright, lawyer; witty, outgoing; meets Keats via Leigh Hunt, becomes a close and supportive friend of Keats Reynolds Bewick, William (1795–1866): an art student of Keats’s very good friend, the historical painter Benjamin Robert Haydon; Bewick socializes with Keats via Haydon and others in Keats’s circle Bewick Lamb, Charles (1775–1834): first-rate essayist, second-rate poet; witty, acute, eloquent; an acquaintance of Keats; close to some of Keats’s friends, including Leigh Hunt and Benjamin Robert Haydon Lamb Hazlitt, William (1778–1830): painter, philosopher, significant critic (literary, theatre, art), journalist, brilliant essayist, lecturer; blunt advocate of human rights and liberty Hazlitt Monkhouse, Thomas (1783–1825): tea merchant; close cousin of Mary Wordsworth (née Hutchinson), wife of William Wordsworth Monkhouse Wordsworth, William (1780–1850): the most significant contemporary poet for Keats; Keats is deeply ambivalent about Wordsworth Wordsworth Dilke, Charles Wentworth (1789–1864): Navy civil servant, legal training, literary and journal editor, scholarly interests in Renaissance drama Dilke Brawne, Fanny (1800–65): Keats’s betrothed; born in London’s West End; likely meets Keats autumn 1818 via the Dilkes (she’s eighteen); lively, social, smart Fanny Brawne Brown, Charles Armitage (1787–1842): businessman, fur merchant, decent amateur artist, writer of a comic opera and some translations as well as a study of Shakespeare’s poems Brown Davenports, the: Likely met via Brown or Dilke; the family live at 2 Church Row, Hampstead. Keats on occasion dines and goes to some parties there the Davenports Rice, James (1792–1832): lawyer, well read; known in the Keats circle as wise, unconditionally kind, noble, witty, sensible, and gentlemanly; poor health Rice Taylor, John (1781–1864): scholarly, progressive publisher and bookseller; editor, minor writer, pyramidologist; half of Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey Taylor Bailey, Benjamin (1791–1853): scholar with philosophical and literary interests, ordained church clergyman; shared his interests in Wordsworth, Milton, Plato, Dante, and Hazlitt with Keats Bailey Woodhouse, Richard (1788–1834): educated at Eton; scholar, writer, conveyancer, legal advisor to Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey Woodhouse Hessey, James (1785–1870): progressive publisher, bookseller; half of Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey; strongly believes in Keats’s poetic potential Hessey Connection level with Keats: intimate close friend friend casual friend acquaintance

Keats’s Selected Social Network © 2021 G. Kim Blank

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Bailey, Benjamin (1791–1853): scholar with philosophical and literary interests, ordained church clergyman; shared his interests in Wordsworth, Milton, Plato, Dante, and Hazlitt with Keats; Keats writes a few very important and theoretically explorative letters to Bailey, and Keats found him of noble disposition; Keats stays with Bailey at Oxford University (Magdalen Hall) in September 1818 into early October; later in life, Bailey wrote minor poetry and sermons; eventually becomes an archdeacon.
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Bewick, William (1795–1866): an art student of Keats’s very good friend, the historical painter Benjamin Robert Haydon; Bewick socializes with Keats via Haydon and others in Keats’s circle: in a letter of 11 February 1818, Bewick calls them very intellectual dinners, and he mentions the presence of Keats the poet, Hazlitt the critic, Haydon, Hunt the publisher, &c., &; Keats runs into Bewick at exhibitions; Bewick goes on to become a portrait and historical painter of average though professional qualities.
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Brawne, Fanny (1800–65): born in London’s West End; likely meets Keats autumn 1818 via the Dilkes (she’s eighteen); lively, social, smart (proficient in German and French), musical, keen perceptions, strong opinions, fashionable, middle-class, but disliked by some of Keats’s friends, who see her as flirtatious and vain (early Keats biographers tend to view her as unfit for Keats); perhaps unofficially betrothed to Keats in late 1818, but more likely a mutual declaration of love; Keats writes striking love letters to her, but when Keats becomes ill they devolve into overly longing and jealous rants as Keats becomes increasing ill and distraught that he might never again be with her (publication of Keats’s love letters in 1878 causes some literary commotion); she remarries in 1833 and has a daughter and two sons; dies in London; Fanny’s widowed mother, Frances, is very kind toward Keats.
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Brown, Charles Armitage (1787–1842): businessman, fur merchant, decent amateur artist, writer of a comic opera and some translations as well as a study of Shakespeare’s poems; some literary lectures; lived independently on inheritance money; one of Keats’s very closest friends (Keats is twenty-one when they meet), and knew Keats as well as anyone; extraordinarily supportive of and generous with Keats; lives with Keats on a few occasions; also travels with Keats, most famously on their long walking tour in the summer of 1818; kept a considerable collection of transcripts of Keats’s work; co-author with Keats of a somewhat indifferent play (never produced), Otho the Great; co-owner of Wentworth Place (two semi-detached houses), now Keats House; attempted a memoir of Keats.
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Clarke, Charles Cowden (1787–1877): teacher, publisher (including music), bookseller, informed musical and literary interests; later an art and theatre reviewer, extensive lectures on Shakespeare, and very minor poet; son of Keats’s headmaster at Enfield; widely connected to literary circles of the day; strong and important early influence on Keats’s literary tastes, as well as, early on, very close to Keats; crucially, he introduces Keats to Leigh Hunt in 1816, thus greatly expanding Keats’s London social network; he mainly drops out of Keats’s circle in 1817; strong defender of Keats’s posthumous reputation; Keats writes a verse letter to Clarke in October 1816, thanking him for tutoring his literary passions.
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The Davenports: Likely met via Brown or Dilke; the family live at 2 Church Row, Hampstead. Keats on occasion dines and goes to some parties there; Keats and Brown at least once reciprocate. Mrs. Davenport kindly helps to take care of Tom, November 1818. Mr. Burrage Davenport (or, at times, incorrectly, “Burridge” or “Benjamin”, 1778-1863) is a well-to-do merchant banker in London. A gift copy of Keats’s last collection (1920) given to the Davenports contains Keats’s angry comment about the book’s advertisement written by the publisher, that wrongly claims that his Hyperion poem in the collection is unfinished because Keats was upset about reviews.
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Dilke, Charles Wentworth (1789–1864): Navy civil servant, legal training, literary and journal editor, scholarly interests in Renaissance drama; co-owner (with Charles Brown) of Wentworth place (now Keats House) in Hampstead, where Keats lives on a few occasions; Keats meets via Reynolds; Keats becomes very friendly with Dilke and Dilke’s family, which he often visits; however, they seem not to approve of Keats’s relationship with Fanny Brawne; the Dilke family is supportive of Keats’s other family members and of Keats’s posthumous reputation.
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Haslam, William (1795–1851): solicitor; generous, kind, and truly devoted friend of Keats when he is in need, as well as Keats’s siblings (especially to Keats’s brother, Tom, when he is sick); Keats likely meets him via brother George; Haslam is the one to suggest Severn accompany Keats to Italy, a trip he helps finance.
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Haydon, Benjamin Robert (1786–1846): historical painter, diarist, lecturer; ambitious, volatile, combative; his artistic achievement compromised by pride, inflexible principles, and ego—and a very slow pace; passionate and devoted friend of Keats after meeting him via Leigh Hunt; true believer in Keats’s genius (and his own); Keats initially equally devoted to Haydon, but increasingly put off by his contentious personality; he thought a great deal about great art (which Keats, importantly, would have heard much about), but overestimated the greatness of his own; commits suicide after lengthy struggles with debt and professional failure; largely responsible for England retaining the Elgin Marbles.
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Hazlitt, William (1778–1830): painter, philosopher, significant critic (literary, theatre, art), journalist, brilliant essayist, lecturer; blunt advocate of human rights and liberty, passionately opinionated, often quarrelsome, intellectually driven; through his lectures and writing, he significantly influences Keats’s maturing tastes and ideas, especially about Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Elizabethan literature, literary worth, poetic genius, the principle of disinterestedness, and the sympathetic powers of imagination; he becomes a friend and a formidable defender of Keats and his poetry, especially against the hypocrisy of partisan reviewing; friends with many of the era’s leading literary figures.
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Hessey, James (1785–1870): progressive publisher, bookseller; half of Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey; strongly believes in Keats’s poetic potential, and with John Taylor basically sponsors Keats’s publishing career.
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Hunt, Leigh (1784–1859): poet, literary critic, editor, journalist, essayist, periodical publisher; charming, somewhat affected personality, energetic, poor with money; editor of the independent and free-thinking Examiner newspaper as well as other periodical publications; jailed two years for libeling the Prince Regent; first to publish Keats; Keats initially enthralled with Hunt, and Hunt fully struck by Keats’s personality and poetic potential; crucially, Hunt introduces Keats into literary London; Keats spends plenty of time with Hunt, and they know each other very well; Keats, though, comes to privately resent Hunt’s poetic pretensions and egotisms, yet Hunt’s kindness toward Keats continued; Keats is forever identified with Hunt as a member of maligned “Cockney School of Poetry.”
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The Jefferys: Keats and his younger two brothers, Tom and George, socialize (somewhat flirtatiously) with the two Jeffery sisters, Marian (variously, Marianne and Mary-Ann) and Sarah Francis (Fanny); in 1818, they are twenty and eighteen, respectively. [There have been earlier misspellings of the last name as Jeffrey.] They meet them in Teignmouth, Devon. Their mother, Margaret, a widow, is particularly unselfish in caring for Tom when he is ill. Keats writes a few fairly open, somewhat humorous but thoughtful letters to Marian mid-1819, mentioning possible future plans, so there is fairly clear degree of familiarity. In 1830, under her married name—Mrs. I. S. Prowse—Marian publishes a collection of poetry (Poems) that pays some allusive homage to Keats; it has a substantial list of subscribers.
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Jones, Isabella (unknown birth/death): attractive, mysterious, slightly older, cultured woman, with whom Keats has some passing romantic involvement in May 1817, that suggests some level of intimacy; she may have suggested the Eve of St. Agnes and Eve of St. Mark as topics for Keats to write about; generous in some minor gifts to Keats and his brother, Tom; Keats may have written a few minor love poems that sound his attraction to and feelings for Isabella (“Unfelt, unheard, unseen,” “Hither, hither love,” “Hush, hush, tread softly”); she has some friends in Keats’s circle.
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Keats, Fanny (1803–89): Keats’s younger sister; some suggestion of resemblance to brother Tom; after 1814 and until 1824, she was the ward of Richard Abbey, the family trustee, who at times thwarted contact between Fanny and Keats; Keats is very much protective of her; some of his final thoughts are of Fanny; she marries a Spanish diplomat and writer in 1826.
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Keats, George (1797–1841): older of Keats two younger brothers; attended same school (in Enfield) as Keats; introduces Keats to some lasting friends; outgoing, fairly ambitious, great belief in Keats’s poetic aspirations; very close to Keats; lives with his brothers at certain points; emigrates to America, June 1818, only to experience business failure; returns to England in 1820 to refinance himself from the family estate, which leads Keats to have some uncertainty about George’s motives; financial and personal success on second trip to America (settling in Kentucky); Keats writes some very important journal letters to George and his wife, Georgiana; dies of consumption.
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Keats, Georgiana (née Wylie) (1798–1879): wife of Keats’s brother, George (they marry 28 March 1818); Keats very fond of her, and admired her modesty and intelligence; Keats writes completely openly to her in some important journal letters co-addressed to George, especially after the couple immigrates to America in June 1818.
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Keats, Tom (1799–1818): Keats’s youngest brother; like Keats, educated at Clarke’s school; tall and thin, considered gentle with good humour; longstanding heath issues; as an adult, lived with Keats on a few occasions; much loved by Keats, with great mutual understanding of each other; Keats nurses Tom to his death from tuberculosis.
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Lamb, Charles (1775–1834): first-rate essayist, second-rate poet; witty, acute, eloquent; an acquaintance of Keats; close to some of Keats’s friends, including Leigh Hunt and Benjamin Robert Haydon; perhaps best known for his Tales From Shakespeare (1807), written with his sister, Mary Ann, whom he takes care of despite a life-long mental illness; long, close friendship with William and Dorothy Wordsworth; Keats meets Lamb at Haydon’s so-called immortal dinner, 28 December 1817, and likely sees him in other circumstances; Lamb in a July 1820 review strongly commends Keats’s 1820 volume. Very much a London man.
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Mathew, George Felton (1795-?): early London friend of Keats, met via his brother, George, mid-1815; some over-estimated poetic aspirations; Keats enjoys some social events with Mathew and his female cousins; Mathew publishes an upbeat poem to Keats in October 1816; Keats writes an epistle to Mathew that appears in his first collection, the 1817 Poems; conservative Mathew evolves some resentment over Keats’s poetic gifts (and politics), and he reviews Keats’s first collection; as their friendships peters (by late 1816), Keats moves into more a more serious and progressive cultural circle via Leigh Hunt.
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Monkhouse, Thomas (1783–1825): well-to-do London merchant; close cousin of Mary Wordsworth (née Hutchinson), wife of William Wordsworth; in late 1817, Benjamin Robert Haydon arranges for Keats to meet Wordsworth via Monkhouse at Monkhouse’s residence; Keats will have a few subsequent meetings with Wordsworth; a few later, Monkhouse runs into Keats and invites him to meet with Wordsworth again in June 1820, but health problems warn him off.
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The Novellos: Via Leigh Hunt’s circle, Keats has some social contact with this highly musical and large family, headed by the mother, Mary, and father, Vincent (1781-1861), though Keats also finds the overly witty behaviour of their company fairly tiresome. Vincent is central to the musical society of the day: organist, pianist, music teacher, composer, choir master, conductor, a founding member of the Philharmonic Society, and, importantly, musical publisher. A few of his daughters will become established singers. In 1828, one of Novello’s daughter will marry Keats’s earliest mentor, Charles Cowden Clarke.
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Ollier, Charles (Ollier brothers, Charles [1788–1859] and James [1795–1851]): publishers, stationers, booksellers; on commission, publishers of Keats’s first collection, Poems, by John Keats, 1817; Charles has some interest in writing poetry; as publishers, James covers more of the business end; publisher of others in Keats’s circle, including Leigh Hunt, Percy Shelley, Charles Lamb; after his first collection, Keats drops the Olliers (for Taylor & Hessey), in part because he does not want to pay for publication, and the Olliers complain that the volume did not sell—Keats felt they did not promote the collection enough; in truth, Poems is a bit of a mess, even at the level of layout; the Olliers are within Hunt’s circle, and Keats does occasional socializing with them.
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Reynolds, John Hamilton (1794–1852): clerk, poet, reviewer, novelist, playwright, lawyer; witty, outgoing; meets Keats via Leigh Hunt, becomes a very close and supportive friend of Keats, and seems to get the direction and level of Keats’s poetic aspirations; Keats writes some significant letters to Reynolds about poetry and his role as a poet; connects Keats with other important friends; Keats also writes a casual verse epistle to Reynolds in March 1818, containing some meandering ideas about art, the imagination, and intensity—key subjects for Keats; Reynolds provides critical feedback to Keats during Keats’s poetic development; Keats friendly with Reynolds’ sister, Jane and Mariane; eventually bankrupt by 1838; on his tombstone: The Friend of Keats.
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Rice, James (1792–1832): lawyer, well read; known in the Keats circle as wise, unconditionally kind, noble, witty, sensible, and gentlemanly; poor health; Keats stays with him for about a month on the Isle of Wight; Keats meets via Reynolds; one of the financial supporters in getting Keats to Italy; becomes Fanny Keats’s lawyer.
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Richards, Thomas (?-?): government worker (ordnance office), sometimes theatre reviewer; a casual friend to Keats and some in Keats’s circle; Keats apparently gets so drunk at a gathering at Richards’ on 14 December 1816 that he is useless the next day (a whoreson night, he calls it—the weather or his state?); he also dines with Richards occasionally through the next few years, up until early 1820; on 17 January 1820, Keats compares Richards to two of his other friends, with the suggestion that Richards is hard to fathom; Charles Richards, Thomas’ brother, is the printer of Keats’s 1817 collection, Poems, though result suggests some inexperience on the part of Charles; the connection with the Richards brothers comes from the circumstance of both of them attending the same school as Keats at Enfield.
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Severn, Joseph (1793–1897): versatile and devoted painter, but mainly a subject painter; attended Royal Academy; initially a friend of Keats, believer in Keats’s genius and in promoting it; introduces some art to Keats; paints famous miniature of Keats (exhibited May 1818); as a last-moment decision, he accompanies Keats to Rome and closely nurses Keats through his final, agonizing months (and details it), which is a defining feature of Severn’s reputation—this earns Severn clear intimacy with Keats; some suggestion that Severn was keen to accompany Keats to Italy because of an illegitimate child; has some early success as a painter in Rome; later British Consul in Rome; buried beside Keats in Rome in matching graves; profited by (and culturally nurtured) his association with Keats.
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Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792–1822): poet; unrelenting radical and reformist enthusiasms, anti-authoritarian, dedicated pursuit of idealised, visionary truths and social justice; eccentric, intellectually precocious, generous, sometimes erratic; marries Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, William Godwin’s daughter; both Percy and Mary acquainted with Keats via Leigh Hunt, and they do a some socializing with Keats; Percy is more enthused by Keats than Keats with him; Shelley invites Keats to Italy to stay with him when Keats is ill—Keats declines; implicit competition and pairing with Keats; writes brilliant elegy to Keats, Adonais; drowns in a sailing accident, aged 29, with Keats’s final collection stuffed into his pocket; buried not too far from Keats in Rome.
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Smith, Horace (Horatio) (1779–1849): stockbroker, quite successful as a journal and newspaper contributor, but a very minor poet, writer of historical novels and parody; known to Percy Shelley as generous.
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Spurgin, John (1797-1866): medical student, then physician, sometimes writer on medical matters, as well as occasional inventor; long-serving Chairman of the Swedenborg Society of London. Keats may have met Spurgin via the Mathews’ social events or through St. Thomas’s Hospital, where Spurgin trained 1813-1815. In a long, detailed December 1815 letter, he attempts to attune Keats to Swedenborgian teachings; earlier, the two must have exchanged some books as well as ideas about religion and belief; it is clear Spurgin hopes to convert skeptical Keats. He fade from Keats’s circle.
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Taylor, John (1781–1864): scholarly, progressive publisher and bookseller; editor, minor writer, pyramidologist; half of Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey; Keats meets through Reynolds; extremely generous with Keats; very loyal to and supportive of Keats and his poetry; helpful biographical knowledge about Keats; along with Hessey, he more or less sponsors Keats’s later publishing.
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Wells, Charles (1800–1879): solicitor; spirited friend of Keats; sometimes dramatist and poet; friend, too, of Keats’s youngest brother, Tom, who schooled with Wells; Keats writes an early poem to Wells; Keats gives an inscribed copy of his first collection the 1817 Poems, by John Keats, to Wells; Keats later very upset with Wells when, in 1818, he looks at the fake letters that Wells, as a joke, had sent to Tom back in 1816; has some reputation with the Pre-Raphaelites.
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Woodhouse, Richard (1788–1834): educated at Eton; scholar, writer, conveyancer, legal advisor to Keats’s publisher, Taylor & Hessey; organizes Keats’s copyright transfer to them before Keats is off to Italy; singularly important collector of Keatsiana; practical and detail oriented; extraordinarily generous with Keats, and a close friend to the end; absolutely sure of Keats’s poetic genius; Keats writes his famous “poetical Character” and “camelion poet” letter to Woodhouse, 27 October 1818; central in organizing Keats’s trip to Italy; dies of tuberculosis.
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Wordsworth, William (1780–1850): the most significant contemporary poet for Keats; Keats is deeply ambivalent about Wordsworth, based mainly on the older poet’s growing pretensions and conservative political affiliation; Keats meets Wordsworth (initially via Haydon) a few times late 1817 into early 1818; in contra-distinguishing himself from Wordsworth, Keats famously condemns the “wordsworthian or egotistic sublime” in poetry (letter, 27 October 1818); Keats is nevertheless in awe of Wordsworth’s poetic depths, which in some of his mature poetry he attempts to emulate—in his own terms, he feels Reverence toward the older poet; Wordsworth is Poet Laureate after 1843 until his death; forever paired with Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
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Wylies, the (May 1818): George Keats (Keats’s brother) marries Georgiana Augusta Wylie (?1797-1879). Georgiana’s parents (her father was a military man) have two sons, Henry and Charles. Via George, Keats comes to know the family and to frequently socialize with them; he is particularly fond of Mrs. Wylie. George and Georgiana emigrate to Kentucky for cheap property and opportunity; they are eventually very successful in business and in creating offspring—eight in total. Some of Keats’s most important letters are written to George and Georgiana after they move to Kentucky; Keats’s tone in these letters marks his familiarity and openness with Georgiana, as well as interest in her family of origin.

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MLA Style: Works Cited

Blank, G. Kim. “Keats’s Selected Social Network.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology. Edition 3.12 , University of Victoria, 11 September 2021. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/relationships.html.

Chicago Style: Note

G. Kim Blank, “Keats’s Selected Social Network,” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.12 , last modified 11th September 2021. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/relationships.html.

Chicago Style: Bibliography

Blank, G. Kim. “Keats’s Selected Social Network.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.12 , last modified 11th September 2021. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/relationships.html.