Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology

Mapping Keats’s Progress
A Critical Chronology

Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer’s Tale Of The Flowre And The Lefe

  • This pleasant tale is like a little copse:
  • The honied lines so freshly interlace,
  • To keep the reader in so sweet a place,
  • So that he here and there full-hearted stops;
  • And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops
  • Come cool and suddenly against his face,
  • And, by the wandering melody, may trace
  • Which way the tender-legged linnet hops.
  • Oh! what a power has white Simplicity!
  • What mighty power has this gentle story!
  • I, that do ever feel athirst for glory,
  • Could at this moment be content to lie
  • Meekly upon the grass, as those whose sobbings
  • Were heard of none beside the mournful robins.

🗙 Cite this page:

MLA Style: Works Cited

Keats, John. “ Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer’s Tale Of The Flowre And The Lefe.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, by G. Kim Blank. Edition 3.5 , University of Victoria, 18 October 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_written_on_a_blank_space_at.html.

Chicago Style: Note

John Keats, “ Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer’s Tale Of The Flowre And The Lefe,” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.5 , last modified 18th October 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_written_on_a_blank_space_at.html.

Chicago Style: Bibliography

Keats, John. “ Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer’s Tale Of The Flowre And The Lefe.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.5 , last modified 18th October 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_written_on_a_blank_space_at.html.