Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology

Mapping Keats’s Progress
A Critical Chronology

Old Meg she was a gipsey

  • Old Meg she was a gipsey,
  • And liv’d upon the moors;
  • Her bed it was the brown heath turf,
  • And her house was out of doors.
  • Her apples were swart blackberries,
  • Her currants, pods o’ broom;
  • Her wine was dew o’ the wild white rose,
  • Her book a churchyard tomb.
  • Her brothers were the craggy hills,
  • Her sisters larchen trees;
  • Alone with her great family
  • She liv’d as she did please.
  • No breakfast had she many a morn,
  • No dinner many a noon,
  • And, ’stead of supper, she would stare
  • Full hard against the moon.
  • But every morn, of woodbine fresh
  • She made her garlanding,
  • And, every night, the dark glen yew
  • She wove, and she would sing.
  • And with her fingers, old and brown,
  • She plaited mats o’ rushes,
  • And gave them to the cottagers
  • She met among the bushes.
  • Old Meg was brave as Margaret Queen
  • And tall as Amazon:
  • An old red blanket cloak she wore;
  • A chip hat had she on.
  • God rest her aged bones somewhere!
  • She died full long agone!

🗙 Cite this page:

MLA Style: Works Cited

Keats, John. “Old Meg she was a gipsey.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, by G. Kim Blank. Edition 3.3 , University of Victoria, 5 September 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_old_meg_she_was_a_gipsey.html.

Chicago Style: Note

John Keats, “Old Meg she was a gipsey,” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.3 , last modified 5th September 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_old_meg_she_was_a_gipsey.html.

Chicago Style: Bibliography

Keats, John. “Old Meg she was a gipsey.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.3 , last modified 5th September 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/poem_old_meg_she_was_a_gipsey.html.