Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology

Mapping Keats’s Progress
A Critical Chronology

Selected Criticism about Keats: 1. Selected Recent; 2. Selected General

  • 1. SELECTED RECENT CRITICISM (2010-)
  • Anselmo, Anna. “Posthuman Keats: Poetry as Assemblage.” Altre Modernità (January 2020): 46-58. (This article explores the notions of flotsam, jetsam and hybridity in John Keats’s poetry in order to provide a critical reading informed by posthumanist theories, and, more specifically, Donna Haraway’s cyborg.)
  • Bari, Shahidha Kazi. Keats and Philosophy: The Life of Sensations. London: Routledge, 2011.
  • Barnard, John. What Letters did Keats take to Rome? Keats-Shelley Journal 64 (2015): 72-91.
  • Carman, Colin. Lacan, Keats, and ‘Noble Animal Man’, in Lacan and Romanticism, ed. Daniela Garofalo and David Sigler. SUNY Press, 2019, 37-59. (On Keats, Lacan, and ecocriticism.)
  • Cronin, Richard. Keats and the Double Life of Poetry. Romanticism 22.2 (July 2016): 147-56. (Nicely complicates the idea of Keats as a political poet.)
  • Dempsey, Sean. ‘Blank Splendour’: Keats, Romantic Visuality, and Wonder. Studies in Romanticism 52:1 (2011): 85-113.
  • Garofalo, Daniela. ‘Give me that voice again . . . Those looks immortal’: Gaze and Voice in Keats’s The Eve of St. Agnes. Studies in Romanticism 49:3 (2010): 353-373. (Examines Keats in the context of the commercial culture that fascinated him but does not assume that this fascination ends with acceptance and full engagement.)
  • Ghosh, Hrileena. John Keats’ Medical Notebook: Text, Context, and Poems. Liverpool UP, 2020. (This book seeks to show the intriguing connections between Keats’ medical knowledge and his greatest poetry.)
  • Graham-Campbell, Angus. ‘The Poet or the Man’: Impressions of John Keats on William Smith Williams. The Keats-Shelley Review 34:1 (2020): 7-11. (Explores the impact Keats had on William Smith Williams, who may have been the last person to shake Keats’s hand as he left for Naples.)
  • Heffernan, James A. “Keats: ‘The Eve of St. Agnes,’ ‘La Belle Dame,’ ‘Lamia’.” Hospitality and Treachery in Western Literature. Yale, UP, 2014: 179-191.
  • Henning, Peter. Keats, Ecocriticsm, and the Poetics of Place. Studies in Romanticism 57:3 (2018): 407-27.
  • Hill, Rosemary. Keats, Antiquarianism, and the Picturesque. EIC 64:2 (2014): 119-37.
  • Jackson, Noel. The Time of Beauty. Studies in Romanticism 50.2 (2011): 311-334. (Opens up the problem of Keats being both an untimely poet and a political one.)
  • Jones, Mark. Reading Keats to the Letter: e. Studies in Romanticism 51.3 (2012): 343-73. (An ingenious examination of the letter e as iconic functioning in Keats’s poetry and poetics—primarily in connection to eyes and gazing.)
  • Jones, Clare. “Bat, Bat, Come Under My Hat.” The Keats-Shelley Review 33.1 (2019): 122-126. (This meditative essay uses the metaphor of the patagium, the unique fold of skin that stretches between the limbs of a bat, as a way to conceptualize John Clare’s and John Keats’s engagement with ancient poetic traditions and Romantic theories of mind.)
  • Lau, Beth. Keats. In Great Shakespeareans, Vol. IV: Lamb, Hazlitt, Keats. Ed. Adrian Poole, 109-159. London: Continuum, 2010.
  • Lee, Tara. ‘Philosophic Numbers Smooth’: The Ambivalence of Song in Keats’s ‘Ode to a Nightingale.’ The Keats-Shelley Review 33.1 (2019): 114-121. (Complicates Keats’s engagement with birdsong, language, music, and the desire for meaning without sensation.)
  • MacGregor, Cora. ‘Physician to All Men’: Keats and the Poet’s Claim to Truth. The Keats-Shelley Review 34:1 (2020): 56-61. (Argues that Keats regarded both poetic material and the mental faculties deployed in the creation of poetry as somatically embodied and that through this the representational quality of the poetic medium, language, is elided.)
  • Mathes, Carmen Faye. ‘Let us not therefore go hurrying about’: Towards an Aesthetics of Passivity in Keats’s Poetics. European Romantic Review 25.3 (2014): 309-18. (Argues that Keats saw passivity as an embodied, and even physically demanding, attitude, that could prompt the interest and attention of others.)
  • McDowell, Stacey. Shiftiness in Keats’s ‘Ode on Indolence’. Romanticism, 23.1 (2017): 27-37. (Argues that the poem with its wordplay, ambiguity and structural instability . . . presents an unsettling, more mischievous side of Negative Capability.)
  • McGrath, Brian. Keats for Beginners. Studies in Romanticism 50.2 (2011): 351-372.
  • Mihani, Loredana. Keats’s Early Poetic Vision: Between the Confines of the Real and the Ideal. The Keats-Shelley Review 29.2 (2015): 93-104.
  • Mulrooney, Jonathan. How Keats Falls. Studies in Romanticism 50.2 (2011): 251-73. (Via Hyperion, the article explores how, for Keats, human identity emerges from the imagination’s necessarily incomplete attempts to comprehend the fullness of its historical experience.)
  • Mulrooney, Jonathan. Keats’s 1817 Occasions. SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900. 59.4 (2019): 741-761. (This article argues that John Keats’s 1817 first volume Poems evinces a commitment to occasionalism that suffuses, and indeed defines, Keats’s work.)
  • Oldfather, Elizabeth. “‘Ode to a Nightingale’: Poetry and the Particularity of Sense.” European Romantic Review 30.5-6 (2019): 557-572. (Argues that Keats’s attention to the fine workings of sensory imagery creates cognitive effects that go beyond his famed synesthesia.)
  • O’Neill, Michael, ed. John Keats in Context. Cambridge UP, 2017. (A very strong and varied collection by many important Keats scholars.)
  • Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of the Spider. Studies in Romanticism 50.2 (2011): 239-250.
  • Myers, Mary Anne. Keats and the Hands of Petrarch and Laura. Keats-Shelley Journal 62 (2013): 99-113.
  • Rejack, Brian and Michael Theune, eds. Keats’s Negative Capability: New Origins and Afterlives. London: Liverpool UP, 2019. (A varied and valuable collection that represent the expandability of Keats’s key term, negative capability.)
  • Roe, Nicholas, ed. John Keats and the Medical Imagination. London: Palgrave, 2017. (Numerous important contributions revolving around Keats’s medical experience and training.)
  • Roe, Nicholas. English Restored: John Keats’s ‘To Autumn’. Essays in Criticism 67.3 (July 2017): 237-58.
  • Rohrbach, Emily and Emily Sun. Reading Keats, Thinking Politics. Studies in Romanticism 50:2 (2011): 229-37. (Gives a very useful historical account of critical engagement about Keats’s political identity.)
  • Reynolds, Suzanne. “‘Some Scraps of Paper’: The Autograph Manuscript of Ode to a Nightingale at the Fitzwilliam Museum.” The Keats-Shelley Review 33.2 (2019): 140-158. (Traces the history of the only surviving autograph manuscript of Ode to a Nightingale and preserved since 1933 in the Fitzwilliam Museum.)
  • Schulkins, Rachel. Keats, Modesty, and Masturbation. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014.
  • Sha, Richard C. John Keats and Some Versions of Materiality. Romanticism 20.3 (2014): 233-45. (Examines Keats from a materialist perspective, analysing Keats’s aesthetics within the framework of materialist possibility [. . .]. Further discussion is offered regarding Romantic philosophies of matter and ideals, readdressing their implications on literary aesthetics.)
  • Sharp, Ronald A. Friendship in the Early Letters of Keats. Wordsworth Circle 47.2-3 (2016): 129-34. (Argues that Keats’s early letters present unequivocal testimony that he understands friendship not as an escape from the painful world [. . .] but as one important way of coming to terms with it.)
  • Stanley-Price, Nicholas. Keats’s Grave Revisited. Keats-Shelley Review 33.2 (2019): 175-93. (Clarifies and expands the history of Keats’s grave in Rome.)
  • Swann, Karen. Lives of Dead Poets: Keats, Shelley, Coleridge. Fordham UP, 2019. (Fixes on how our fascination with Keats’s life informs our reading of his work.)
  • Thomson, Heidi. Keats’s Letters: ‘A Wilful and Dramatic Exercise of Our Minds Toward Each Other’. Keats-Shelley Review 25.2 (2011): 160-74.
  • Turley, Richard Marggraf, ed. Keats’s Places. London: Palgrave Macmillan 2018. (This collection, with chapters by some prominent Keats scholars, profitably explores the idea of place in Keats’s life and poetry.)
  • Turley, Richard Marggraf. Keats on Two Wheels. Studies in Romanticism 57:4 (2018): 601-25. (A free-wheeling exploration of Keats’s one allusion to the velocipede.)
  • Vrijders. Dries. “History, Poetry, and the Footnote: Cleanth Brooks and Kenneth Burke on Keats’s ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’.” New Literary History 42:3 (2011): 537-552.
  • White, R. S. Keats: A Literary Life. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Reading John Keats. Cambridge UP, 2015. (Truly engaging readings of Keats’s poetry.)
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Yeats’s Latent Keats / Keats’s Latent Yeats. PMLA 131.3 (2016): 603-621. (A development of this essay also appears as a chapter in Wolfson’s book Romantic Shades and Shadows [Johns Hopkins UP, 2018], which also has other discussions of Keats.)
  • Wunder, Jennifer, N. Keats, Hermeticism, and the Secret Societies. New York: Routledge, 2016. First published by Ashgate, 2008. (Suggests that Keats’s thinking and poetry is in part informed by his knowledge of hermeticism and secret societies.)
  • 2. GENERAL SELECTED CRITICSM
  • Aske, Martin. Keats and Hellenism: An Essay. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1985.
  • Barnard, John. John Keats. Cambridge, 1987.
  • Barnard, John. Keats’s Letters: ‘Remembrancing and Enchaining.’ In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 120-134. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Barnard, John. First Fruits or First Blights: A New Account of the Publishing History of Keats’s Poems (1817). Romanticism 12.2 (2006), 71-101.
  • Barnard, John. Who Killed John Keats? Times Literary Supplement, 2 Dec. 2009.
  • Barth, J. Robert. Keats’s Way of Salvation. Studies in Romanticism 45.2 (2006): 285-97.4
  • Bate, Walter Jackson. Negative Capability. The Intuitive Approach in Keats. New York: Contra Mundum P, 2012. (Originally published in 1939; a key book.)
  • Bate, Walter Jackson. John Keats. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1963.
  • Bate, Walter Jackson. The Stylistic Development of Keats. New York: Modern Language Association, 1945.
  • Bayley, John. Keats and Reality. In Proceedings of the British Academy (1962): 91-125.
  • Bennett, Andrew. Keats, Narrative and Audience: The Posthumous Life of Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994.
  • Bernstein, Gene. “Keats’s ‘Lamia’: The Sense of a Non-Ending,” Papers on Language and Literature 15 (1979): 175-92.
  • Beer, Gillian. Aesthetic Debate in Keats’s Odes. Modern Language Review 64.4 (1969) 742-48.
  • Bewell, Alan. Keats’s ‘Realm of Flora’. Studies in Romanticism 31.1 (1992) 71-98.
  • Bewell, Alan. “The Political Implication of Keats’s Classicist Aesthetics,” Studies in Romanticism 25 (1986) 221-30.
  • Bloom, Harold. Poetry and Repression: Revisionism from Blake to Stevens. New Haven: Yale UP, 1976. (Contains a challenging reading of The Fall of Hyperion.)
  • Bloom, Harold. “Keats and the Embarrassments of Poetic Tradition,” in The Ringers in the Tower. U Chicago P, 1971.
  • Bostetter, Edward E. “Keats,” in The Romantic Ventriloquists. U Washington P, 1963.
  • Bradley, A. C. The Letters of John Keats. Oxford Lectures on Poetry. 209-244. London: Macmillan, 1950.
  • Bromwich, David. Keats. In Hazlitt: The Mind of a Critic, 362–401. New York: Oxford UP, 1983.
  • Bromwich, David. Keats’s Radicalism. Studies in Romanticism 25.2 (1986): 197-210.
  • Brooks, Cleanth. Keats’s Sylvan Historian: History Without Footnotes. In The Well Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry. 139-52. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1947.
  • Burke, Kenneth. Symbolic Action in a Poem by Keats. Accent 4 (1943).
  • Christensen, Allan C., et. al., eds. The Challenge of Keats: Bicentenary Essays, 1795-1995. Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000.
  • Cheatham, George. Byron’s Dislike of Keats’s Poetry.Keats-Shelley Journal. 32 (1983): 20-25.
  • Cox, Jeffrey N. Lamia, Isabella, and The Eve of St. Agnes — Eros and ‘romance’. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 53-68. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Cox, Jeffrey. Poetry and Politics in the Cockney School: Keats, Shelley, Hunt and their Circle. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. (Central to understanding Keats’s political context.)
  • Creaser, John. John Keats: Odes. In A Companion to Romanticism. Ed. Duncan Wu, 237-246. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 1999.
  • de Almeida, Hermione. Romantic Medicine and John Keats. New York: Oxford UP, 1991.
  • de Man, Paul. Introduction. In John Keats: Selected Poetry: ix-xxxvi. New York: New American Library, 1966. (An underused introduction to Keats, but with some strong insights.)
  • Dickstein, Morris. Keats and His Poetry. U Chicago P, 1971.
  • Dickstein, Morris. Keats and Politics. Studies in Romanticism 25 (1986): 175-181.
  • Edmundson, Mark. Keats’s Mortal Stance. Studies in Romanticism 26.1 (1987): 85-104.
  • Eisner, Eric. Keats, Lyric and Personality. In Nineteenth Century Poetry and Literary Celebrity. Ed. Eric Eisner, 48-67. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
  • Eliot, T. S. Shelley and Keats. In The Use of Poetry and the Use of Criticism. London: Faber, 1933.
  • Ende, Stuart. Keats and the Sublime. New Haven: Yale UP, 1976.
  • Everest, Kelvin. Shelley’s Adonais and John Keats. Essays in Criticism 57:3 (2007): 237-64.
  • Evert, Walter H. and Jack W. Rhodes, eds. Approaches to Teaching Keats’s Poetry. New York: Modern Language Association, 1991.
  • Fermanis, Porschia. John Keats and the Ideas of the Enlightenment. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2009.
  • Finney, Claude Lee. Evolution of Keats’s Poetry. 2 vols. Harvard UP, 1936.
  • Ford, Newell F. The Prefigurative Imagination of John Keats, Stanford Studies in Language and Literature. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1951.
  • Fraser, G. S., ed. John Keats: Odes: A Casebook. London, Macmillan, 1971.
  • Friedman, Geraldine. The Erotics of Interpretation in Keats’s ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’: Pursuing the Feminine. Studies in Romanticism 32 (1993): 225-43.
  • Fry, Paul. History, Existence and ‘To Autumn.’ Studies in Romanticism 25 (1986): 211-19.
  • Gallant, Christine. Keats and Romantic Celticism. Basingstoke: Palgrave/Macmillan, 2005.
  • Gigante, Denise. Keats’s Nausea. Studies in Romanticism 40.4 (2001): 481-510.
  • Gittings, Robert. Keats and Medicine. Contemporary Review 219 (1971): 138-42.
  • Gittings, Robert. John Keats: The Living Year. London: Heinemann, 1954. (One of key biographies.)
  • Goellnicht, Donald C. The Poet-Physician: Keats and Medical Science. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh UP, 1984.
  • Goellnicht, Donald C. Keats on Reading: ‘Delicious Diligent Indolence’. The Journal of English and Germanic Philology88:2 (1989): 1990-2010.
  • Hartman, Geoffrey. Poem and Ideology: A Study of Keats’s ‘To Autumn’. In The Fate of Reading. Chicago: U. of Chicago P., 1975: 57–73.
  • Hartman, Geoffrey. Spectral Symbolism and Authorial Self in Keats’s Hyperion. In The Fate of Reading. Chicago: U. of Chicago P., 1975: 124–46.
  • Hayden, John O., ed. Romantic Bards and British Reviewers. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1971.
  • Heffernan, James A. Shelley’s Consumption of Keats. Studies in Romanticism 23:3 (1984): 295-315.
  • Homans, Margaret. Keats Reading Women, Women Reading Keats. Studies in Romanticism 29 (1990): 341–70.
  • Jack, Ian. Keats and the Mirror of Art. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1967.
  • Jackson, Noel. Science and Sensation in Romantic Poetry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. (Chapter 5 is on Keats.)
  • Jones, John. John Keats’s Dream of Truth. London: Chatto and Windus, 1969.
  • Jones, Leonidas M. Reynolds and Keats. Keats-Shelley Journal 7 (Winter 1958): 47-59.
  • Jones, Leonidas M. Edward Holmes and Keats. Keats-Shelley Journal 44 (1974): 119-128.
  • Kandl, John. Leigh Hunt’s Examiner and the Construction of a Public ‘John Keats’. Keats-Shelley Journal 44 (1995) 84-101.
  • Kandl, John. The Politics of Keats’s Early Poetry, in The Cambridge Companion to Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson. Cambridge UP, 2001, 1-19.
  • Keach, William. Cockney Couplets: Keats and the Politics of Style. 2.25 Studies in Romanticism (1986): 182-96.
  • Keach, William. Byron Reads Keats in The Cambridge Companion to Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson. Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Kelley, Theresa M. Poetics and the Politics of Reception: Keats’s ‘La Belle Dame sans Merci.’ English Literary History 54:2 (1987): 333–62.
  • Kelley, Theresa M. Keats and ‘Ekphrasis.’ In The Cambridge Companion to Keats, ed. Susan J. Wolfson. Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Kern, Robert. Keats and the Problem of Romance, Philological Quarterly 58 (1979): 171-91.
  • Ketchian, Sonia. Keats and the Russian Poets. Birmingham: U of Birmingham Press, 2001.
  • Knoepflmacher, U. C. The Return of a Native Singer: Keats in Hardy’s Dorset. In Influence and Resistance in Nineteenth-Century Poetry. Ed. G. Kim Blank and Margot K. Louis. Macmillan, 1993, 112-30.
  • Kucich, Greg. Keats and English Poetry. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 186-202. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Kucich, Greg. Keats, Shelley, and Romantic Spenserianism. University Park: Pennsylvania State UP, 1991.
  • Kucich, Greg. The Poetry of Mind in Keats’s Letters. Style 21 (1987): 76-94. (A terrific way to get into the letters.)
  • Lau, Beth, Keats’s Paradise Lost. Florida: U. of Florida P., 1998.
  • Lau, Beth. Keats’s Reading of the Romantic Poets. Ann Arbor: U. of Michigan Press, 1991.
  • Lau, Beth. Protest, ’Nativism,’ and Impersonation in the Works of Chatterton and Keats. Studies in Romanticism 42.4 (2003): 519-39.
  • Levinson, Marjorie. Keats’s Life of Allegory: The Origins of a Style. New York: Basil Blackwell, 1988. (A game-changing book.)
  • Levinson, Marjorie. The Dependent Fragment: ‘Hyperion’ and ‘The Fall of Hyperion’, in The Romantic Fragment Poem. Chapel Hill: U North Carolina P, 1986.
  • Li, Ou. Keats and Negative Capability. London: Bloomsbury, 2009.
  • Lockridge, Laurence S. Keats: the Ethics of Imagination. In Coleridge, Keats and the Imagination: Romanticism and Adam’s Dream. Edited by J. Robert Barth and John L. Mahoney, 143-73. Columbia: U. of Missouri P., 1990.
  • Luke, David. Keats’s Letters: Fragments of an Aesthetic of Fragments. Genre 11 (1978): 209-226.
  • Marggraf-Turley, Richard. Keats’s Boyish Imagination: The Politics of Immaturity. New York: Routledge, 2004.
  • Marsh, George L. and Newman I. White. Keats and the Periodicals of his Time. Modern Philology 30:1 (1934): 37-53.
  • Matthews, G. M., ed. Keats: The Critical Heritage. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1971.
  • McFarland, Thomas. The Masks of Keats: The Endeavour of a Poet. New York: Oxford UP, 2000.
  • McGann, Jerome J. Keats and the Historical Method in Literary Criticism. Modern Language Notes 94 (1979): 988-1032. (A key essay.)
  • McKusick, James. Green Writing: Romanticism and Ecology. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2000.
  • Mellor, Anne K. Keats and the Complexities of Gender. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 214-229. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Minahan, John A. Word Like a Bell: John Keats, Music and the Romantic Poet. Kent, Ohio: Kent State UP, 1992.
  • Mizukoshi, Ayumi. Keats, Hunt and The Aesthetic of Pleasure. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2001.
  • Murry, John Middleton. Keats and Shakespeare: A Study of Keats’s Poetic Life from 1816 to 1820. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1925. (Dated, yet generally sensible and insightful.)
  • Najarian, James. Victorian Keats: Manliness, Sexuality, and Desire. Hampshire: Palgrave, 2002.
  • Newey, Vincent. Hyperion, The Fall of Hyperion, and Keats’s Epic Ambitions. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 69-85. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Newey, Vincent. Keats, History, and the Poets. In Keats and History. Ed. Nicholas Roe, 165–93. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995.
  • Newey, Vincent. Keats, Politics, and the Idea of Revolution. In Centring the Self: Subjectivity, Society and Reading from Thomas Gray to Thomas Hardy. 97-121. Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1995.
  • O’Neill, Michael. Keats: Bicentenary Readings. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1977. (A strong collection.)
  • O’Rourke, James. Keats’s Odes and Contemporary Criticism. Gainesville: U. P. of Florida, 1998.
  • Perkins, David. The Quest for Permanence: The Symbolism of Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats. Chapters 7–9, 190–301. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1959.
  • Phinney. A. W. Keats in the Museum: Between Aesthetics and History. Journal of English and German Philology. 90 (1991): 208-22.
  • Redpath, Theodore. The Young Romantics and Critical Opinion, 1807- 1824. London: Harrap, 1973.
  • Reiman, Donald, ed. The Romantics Reviewed: Contemporary Reviews of British Romantic Writers, Part C, v. 1-2: Shelley, Keats, and London Radical Writers. New York and London: Garland Press, 1972.
  • Richardson, Alan. Keats and Romantic Science: Writing the body. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 230-245. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Ricks, Christopher. Keats’s Sources, Keats’s Allusions. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 152-169. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Ricks, Christopher. Keats and Embarrassment. London: Oxford UP, 1974.
  • Robinson, Jeffrey C. Reception and Poetics in Keats: My Ended Poet. New York: St Martin’s Press, 1998.
  • Roe, Nicholas, ed. Keats and History. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995. (A very important gathering of historicist thinking about Keats.)
  • Roe, Nicholas. John Keats’s ‘Green World’: Politics, Nature and the Poems. In The Challenges of Keats: Bicentenary Essays 1795–1995. Ed. Allan Christensen et al., 61-77. Amsterdam, GA: Rodopi, 2000.
  • Roe, Nicholas. John Keats and the Culture of Dissent. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997. (Importantly situates Keats in a republican, radical context.)
  • Roe, Nicholas. John Keats and George Felton Mathew: Poetics, Politics, and the European Magazine. Keats-Shelley Journal 49 (2000): 31-36.
  • Rovee, Christopher. Trashing Keats, ELH 75 (2008) 993-1022.
  • Rzepka, Charles J. Keats: Watcher and Witness, in The Self as Mind. Cambridge: Harvard U P, 1986.
  • Saly, John. Keats’s Answer to Dante: The Fall of Hyperion. Keats-Shelley Journal. 14 (1965): 65-78.
  • Schwartz, Lewis M. Keats’s Critical Reception in Newspapers of His Day. Keats-Shelley Journal. 21/22 (1972/1973): 170-87.
  • Scott, Grant F. The Sculpted Word: Keats, Ekphrasis, and the Visual Arts. UP of New England, 1994.
  • Scott, Grant F. Introduction: Tabloid Keats. European Romantic Review 6:1 (1995): i-xii.
  • Scott, Grant F. Writing Keats’s Last Days: Severn, Sharp, and Romantic Biography. Studies in Romanticism 42.1 (2003): 3-26. (A profitable re-evaluation of Severn’s character and place in Keats’s legacy.)
  • Sheats, Paul D. Keats and the Ode. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 86-101. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Sheats, Paul D. Keats, the Greater Ode, and the Trial of Imagination. In Coleridge, Keats, and the Imagination: Romanticism and Adam’s Dream. Ed. J. Robert Barth, S. J. and John L. Mahoney, 174-200. Columbia: U. of Missouri P., 1990.
  • Sheats, Paul. “Stylistic Discipline in The Fall of Hyperion.Keats-Shelley Journal 17 (1968) 75-88.
  • Sherwin, Paul. ‘Dying into life’: Keats’s Struggle with Milton in Hyperion. Publications of the Modern Language Association 93:3 (1978): 383-395.
  • Siegel, Jonah. “Among the English Poets: Keats, Arnold, and the Placement of Fragments.” Victorian Poetry 37:2 (1999): 215–232.
  • Siler, Jack L. Poetic Language and Political Engagement in the Poetry of Keats. New York: Routledge, 2007. (Connects Keats’s poetry with social history.)
  • Slote, Bernice. Keats and the Dramatic Principle. Lincoln, Nebraska: U. of Nebraska P, 1958.
  • Smith, Hillas. Keats and Medicine. Newport: Cross Publishing, 1995.
  • Spiegelman, Willard. Keats’s Figures of Indolence. Majestic Indolence: English Romantic Poetry and the Work of Art. Oxford UP, 1995: 83-107.
  • Sperry, Stuart M. Keats the Poet. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1973. (Remains a very strong series of readings.)
  • Stewart, Garrett. Lamia and the Language of Metamorphosis. Studies in Romanticism 15 (1976): 3-41.
  • Stewart, Garrett. Keats and Language. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson. Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Stillinger, Jack. The Hoodwinking of Madeline and Other Essays on Keats’s Poems. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1971. (One of the major sensible and probing thinkers about Keats.)
  • Stillinger, Jack. Keats and Coleridge. In Coleridge, Keats, and the Imagination: Romanticism and Adam’s Dream. Ed. J. Robert Barth and John Mahoney. Columbia: U. of Missouri P., 1990.
  • Stillinger, Jack. Reading The Eve of St. Agnes: The Multiples of Complex Literary Transaction. Oxford UP, 1999.
  • Stillinger, Jack. Romantic Complexity: Keats, Coleridge and Wordsworth. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2006.
  • Stillinger, Jack. The Story of Keats. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 246-60. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001, 246-60.
  • Studies in Romanticism. Keats and Politics: A Forum. v. 25, Summer 1986. (An important gathering that establishes Keats in a political context.)
  • Sugan, Michio. Was ’Keats’s Last Sonnet’ Really Written on board the Maria Crowther? Studies in Romanticism 34:3 (1995): 413-440.
  • Swann, Karen. Endymion’s Beautiful Dreamers. In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 20-36. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  • Swann, Karen. “The Strange Time of Reading.” European Romantic Review 9 (1998): 275-82
  • Trilling, Lionel. ‘Introduction’ to The Selected Letters (1951); rpt. The Poet as Hero: Keats in His Letters. In The Opposing Self, 3-43. New York: Harcourt, Brace, and Javanovic, 1955.
  • Turley, Richard Marggraf. Keats’ Boyish Imagination. London: Routledge, 2004.
  • Vendler, Helen. Coming of Age as a Poet: Milton, Keats, Eliot and Plath. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2003.
  • Vendler, Helen. The Odes of John Keats. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1983. (A remarkable series of close yet expansive readings.)
  • Waldoff, Leon. Keats’s Identification with Wordsworth. Keats-Shelley Journal 38 (1989): 47-65.
  • Walker, Carol Kyros. Walking North With Keats. Yale UP, 1992.
  • Wang, Orin. Coming Attractions: ’Lamia’ and Cinematic Sensation. Studies in Romanticism 42:4 (2003): 461-500.
  • Watkins, Daniel P. Keats’s Poetry and the Politics of the Imagination. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson UP, 1989.
  • Wasserman, Earl. The Finer Tone: Keats’s Major Poems. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1953.
  • Webb, Timothy. ‘Cutting Figures’: Rhetorical Strategies in Keats’s Letters. In Keats: Bicentenary Readings, ed. Michael O’Neill. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 1977, 144-69.
  • White, R. S. Keats as a Reader of Shakespeare. London: Athlone Press, 1987.
  • White, R. S. Like Esculapius of Old: Keats’s Medical Training. Keats-Shelley Review. 12:1 (1998); 15-49.
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Keats the Letter-Writer: Epistolary Poetics. Romanticism Past and Present 6 (1982): 43-61.
  • Wolfson, Susan J., ed. Keats and Politics: A Forum. Studies in Romanticism 25:2 (Summer 1986).
  • Wolfson, Susan J. The Questioning Presence: Wordsworth, Keats, and the Interrogative Mode in Romantic Poetry. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1986.
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Formal Charges: The Shaping of Poetry in British Romanticism. Palo Alto: Stanford U P, 1997. (Contains a chapter on Keats’s last poems.)
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Formal Charges: The Shaping of Poetry in British Romanticism. Chapter 6, Teasing Form: The Crisis of Keats’s Last Lyrics: 164-192. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1999.
  • Wolfson, Susan J. ed. The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Cambridge UP, 2001. (Contains a very strong gathering of contributors to Keats studies.)
  • Wolfson, Susan J. Borderlines: The Shiftings of Gender in British Romanticism. Palo Alto: Stanford UP, 2006. (Contains two chapters on Keats and gender.)
  • Wolfson, Susan J., ed. John Keats: A Longman Cultural Edition. New York: Pearson, 2007. (Very profitably intersperses poems, letters, reviews, and other work or the era.)
  • Woof, Robert and Stephen Hebron. John Keats. Grasmere: The Wordsworth Trust, 1995.
  • Wu, Duncan. Keats and the ‘Cockney School.’ In The Cambridge Companion to Keats. Ed. Susan J. Wolfson, 37-52. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.

🗙 Cite this page:

MLA Style: Works Cited

Blank, G. Kim. “Selected Criticism about Keats: 1. Selected Recent; 2. Selected General.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology. Edition 3.0 , University of Victoria, 2 July 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/criticism.html.

Chicago Style: Note

G. Kim Blank, “Selected Criticism about Keats: 1. Selected Recent; 2. Selected General,” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.0 , last modified 2nd July 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/criticism.html.

Chicago Style: Bibliography

Blank, G. Kim. “Selected Criticism about Keats: 1. Selected Recent; 2. Selected General.” Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, Edition 3.0 , last modified 2nd July 2020. https://johnkeats.uvic.ca/criticism.html.